Showing posts with label English. Show all posts
Showing posts with label English. Show all posts

16 April, 2017

:Study Notes On Adjectives

ADJECTIVE

Rule-1 Adjective of quantity like much, LITTLE, ENOUGH, SUFFICIENT, WHOLE, etc. must be used with uncountable nouns only as they express quantity and not number. 
Ex.-Many (not much) boys are absent from the class today. 
Many (not much) boys failed in the examination. 

Rule-2 The use of ‘few’, ‘a few’ and ‘the few’ should be used with care they denote number. Few means ‘NOT MANY’.
Few has negative meaning 
A few means ‘SOME AT LEAST’ 
The few means ‘WHATEVER THERE IS’.

Ex. I read few books.
I Read a few books.
I Read the few books I had.
A few men are true from fault. (Incorrect)
Few men are true from fault. (Correct)

Rule-3 Use of little, a little, the little 
Little means ‘hardly any’ in quantity. 
Ex.-He had little money
There is little water in the bottle 
There is a little hope of his recovery (Incorrect)
There is little hope of his recovery (Correct)

A little means ‘Some’ in quantity if not much. 
Ex.-Little knowledge is a dangerous thing. (Incorrect)
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.(correct) 
He had a little money. 
There is a little water in the bottle. 

The little means ‘not much in quantity but all that is’. 
Ex.-I spent the little money I had. 
 little water that is in the bottle may be used for the patient. (Incorrect)
A little water that is in …………….. (Correct)

Rule-4 Adjective of number must be used only with the countable nouns and not with uncountable as they indicate number and not quantity. 
Ex-I have taken many milk today. (Incorrect)
I have taken much milk today. (Correct)

Do not drink so many water. (Incorrect)
Do not drink so much water. (Correct)

Rule-5 Some, All, Any, No. Most etc. may be used both as adjectives of number and Adjectives of quantity as they can express number as well as quantity. 
Ex.-There are no boys in the class (Adj. of Number)
There is no milk in the pot. (Adj. of quantity)

All big machines are imported from foreign countries. (Adj. of number)
All the sugar was thrown into the sea. (Adj. of Quantity)

Give me some water. (Adj. of Quantity)
Some of these students are excellent. (Adj. of Number)

Rule-6 the comparative adjectives, ending with like superior, inferior, senior, junior,  prior, anterior, posterior, exterior etc. Take ‘to after them and not ‘than’.
Ex.-He is senior than me. (Incorrect)
He is senior to  me. (Correct)

Health is preferable than wealth. (Incorrect)
Health is preferable to wealth.  (Correct)

Rule-7 Double comparative adjectives or double superlative adjectives must not be used. 
(Incorrect) He is more senior than me. 
(Correct) He is senior to me.

Milk is more preferable than tea. (Incorrect)
Milk is preferable to tea. (Correct)

Ashoka was the most strongest  of the kings. (Incorrect)
Ashoka was the strongest of the kings. (Correct)

Rule-8 Comparative degree must be used when the comparison is between two persons of things and superlative degree when the comparison is among more than two things. 
Ex.-Who is the tallest of these two brothers ? (Incorrect)
Who is taller of these two brothers ? (Correct)

He is wise of all students in the class. (Incorrect)
He is the wisest of all students in the class. (Correct)

Rule-9 The comparative ending in ‘er’ is not used when we compare two qualities in the same person or thing. In that case we use ‘more’ before the Adjective. 
Ex.- Ram is braver than wise. (Incorrect)
Ram is more brave than wise (Correct)

Rule-10 Use of (Later, Latter; latest, last)
Later and Latest – shows time
Latter and last – shows position

Ex.-He latter refused to come (Incorrect)
He later refused to come. (Correct)

The later part of the novel is not clearly written (Incorrect)
The latter part of the novel is not clearly written . (Correct)

Rule-11 Use of (farther, further; farthest, furthest) 
Farther, Farthest - denote distance 
Further, Furthest - next, also (position)

Ex.-After this he made no farther statement. (Incorrect)
After this he made no further statement. (Correct)

Delhi is farther from Haridwar than Roorkee. 
Don’t make further delay. 

Rule-12 Before superlative adjectives articles ‘THE’ must (always) placed. 
Ex.-He is the best boy of the class. 
She is the most intelligent girl. 

Rule-13 Use of (Nearest, next)
Nearest denotes distance. 
Next denotes position. 

Ex.-He was sitting next to me. 
Patna junction is the nearest to my house. 

This is the next post-office to my house. (Incorrect)
This is the nearest post-office to my house. (Correct)

Rule-14 Use of (Elder, older; Eldest, oldest)
Elder and eldest – are used of members of the same family.
Older and oldest are used for persons or things. 

Elder takes ‘To’ after it while older takes ‘than’ 
Ex.-I have an older brother (Incorrect)
I have an elder brother (Correct)

Mohan is the eldest boy in the town. (Incorrect)
Mohan is the oldest boy in the town. (Correct)

Rule-15 Use of less and fewer 
Less - Quantity 
Fewer - Number 
Ex.-There is fewer sugar in your tea than in mine. (Incorrect)
There is less sugar in your tea than in mine. (Correct)
He has less money than I.

Rule-16 Some adjectives like (Perfect, Ideal, Full, Chief, Unique, Complete, Infinite, Extreme, Entire, Universal, Empty, Impossible, Unanimous, square, sound etc. are not compared as they express meaning which do not admit of any variation of degrees. 
Ex.-This achievement was most unique. (Incorrect)
His achievement was unique. (Correct) 

Your knowledge is most perfect. (Incorrect)
Your knowledge is perfect (Incorrect)

Rule-17 When a comparison is introduced and has ‘ANY’ after it, the things compared must always be excluded from the class of things with which it is compared, by using ‘OTHER’

Ex.-London is larger than any city in England. (Incorrect)
London is larger than any other city in England (Correct)

Ram is cleverer than any student in his class (Incorrect)
Ram is cleverer than any other student in his class. (Correct)

The tiger is as swift as any animal.
The tiger is as swift as any other animal. 

Rule-18 ‘Each’ is used to indicate a limited number and ‘EVERY’ to denote an unlimited number  in selection or choice. 

Ex.-Everyone of the two boys was given a prize. (Incorrect)
Each one of the two boys was given a prize (Correct)

He came to see us Each day. (Incorrect)
He came to see us Every day. (Correct)

Rule-19 "Some" is used in the affirmative sentence "any" is used in negative and interrogative  sentence. 
I don’t want some chocolates. (Incorrect)
I don’t want any chocolates (Correct)

I will have any tea. (Incorrect)
I will have some tea. (Correct)

Did you go somewhere last night ?
Did you go anywhere last night ? 

Rule-20 What’s the Correct Order for Multiple Adjectives in a sentence?
When you list several adjectives in a row, there’s a specific order they need to be written or spoken. Native speakers of English tend to put them in the correct order naturally, but if you’re learning English, you’ll have to memorize the order. It goes like this:
Before the adjectives you will normally have the Determiner.

1.Determiner: The determiner tells us if the noun is singular or plural, definite or indefinite

a, an, the, my, your, four, those, some etc

2.Quantity or number: 

3.Quality or opinion: Explains what we think about something. This is usually our opinion, attitude or observations. These adjectives almost always come before all other adjectives.
beautiful, boring, stupid, delicious, useful, lovely, comfortable

4.Size: Tells us how big or small something is.
big, small, tall, huge, tiny

5.Shape / Weight / Length: Tells about the shape of something or how long or short it is. It can also refer to the weight of someone or something.
round, square, circular, skinny, fat, heavy, straight, long, short,

6.Condition: Tells us the general condition or state of something
broken, cold, hot, wet, hungry, rich, easy, difficult, dirty

7.Age: Tells us how old someone or something is.
old, young, new, ancient, antique

8. Colour: The colour or approximate colour of something.
green, white, blue, reddish, purple

9.Pattern: The pattern or design of something.
striped, spotted, checked, flowery

10.Origin: Tells us where something is from.
American, British, Italian, eastern, Australian, Chilean

11.Material: What is the thing made of or constructed of?
gold, wooden, silk, paper, synthetic, cotton, woolen

12.Purpose/Qualifier/Use: What is it for? These adjectives often end in –ing.
sleeping (bag), gardening (gloves), shopping (bag), wedding (dress)
If you look at the examples above, you can ask… what are the gloves used for? (gardening) What is the bag used for? (shopping)

And after these  adjectives we have the…
13.Noun: The person or thing that is being described

This is the correct order for adjectives that come directly before a noun, and they are separated by commas.

Ex- My beautiful, big, circular, antique, brown, English, wooden coffee table was broken in the move.

If the adjectives come after the verb “be” as the complement, then the qualifier will stick with the noun at the beginning of the sentence. The adjectives in the complement are separated by commas with the final two being separated by “and.”
For example-
My coffee table is beautiful, big, circular, antique, brown, English and wooden.

Ex- I love that really big old green antique car that always parked at the end of the street. 
Ex- a wonderful old Italian Car.(opinion-age- origin) 
A big square blue box. (size -shape- color) 
A disgusting pink plastic ornament. (opinion- color- material)
I bought a pair of black leather.  (color-material)

16 September, 2016

SSC/BANKING: Sentence Correction-Tricks and Practice Questions

Hello, Greetings!! 

As you all know, SSC Mains/IBPS/RRBs exams are Coming up and English Section plays a very important role in your overall selection. So, we've decided to help you with all the tricky and advance scenarios in English Grammar. We'll keep you informed about such Complex Sentence Structures.

There are six basic kinds of errors in the grammar of a sentence. 

Error type-1  Subject -verb agreement 

Error type -2. Errors of modifiers 

Modifiers are words / group of words / phrases in one part of sentence , which modify another part of the sentence. 

In correct written English ,the modifier has to be kept as close as possible to the word or clause it modifies. 

Ex- bruised and battered, Ravi gave his Car to the mechanic. 

Bruised and battered , the car was given to the mechanic by Ravi. 

Errors type -3 errors in the usage of Pronouns . 

The pronouns used in a sentence should agree with their antecedents. 

Error type - 4 error in the tense of the verbs. 

Error type - 5 errors of parallelism 

Error type -6 error in the use of singular words/ idioms and phrases. 

Proper use of adverbs , prepositions. Conjunctions. Adjectives.

Q.1 With the advent of YouTube, Facebook, and Flickr, many savvy political consultants undertook revolutionary micro-targeting and get-out-the-vote techniques that enabled political candidates with cash-strapped budgets to be able to reach numerous likely voters and succeed in raising large numbers of money from enthusiastic and committed supporters in a short period of time.

A.cash-strapped budgets to be able to reach numerous likely voters and succeed in raising large numbers of money

B.cash-strapped budgets to reach numerous likely voters and be successful in raising large amounts of money

C.cash-strapped budgets to reach numerous likely voters, succeeding in raising large amounts of money

D.cash-strapped budgets to reach numerous likely voters and succeed in raising large amounts of money

E.cash-strapped budgets to be able to reach numerous likely voters and succeed in raising large amounts of money

Explanation: Option(D) is correct

The sentence must be constructed such that corresponding consequences of an action are parallel. Specifically, the sentence should read enabled political candidates with cash-strapped budgets to x and y where x and y are parallel.

The phrase to be able to z is redundant and should be replaced by to z

The phrase numbers of money should be amounts of money since number is only used when the object in question can be counted and money cannot be counted (i.e., you do not say 1 money, 2 money, 3 money). Note: By comparison, dollars can be counted (i.e., you would say 1 dollar, 2 dollars, 3 dollars) and as a result, we would say: the number of dollars.

a.the phrase to be able to reach is redundant and can be shortened as follows: to reach; large numbers of money is not grammatically correct since money itself cannot be counted and, as a result, amount should be used instead

b.the phrase to reach...and be successful is not parallel

c.this sentence is set up such that succeeding modifies reaching voters instead of being a separate action on its own

d.the phrase is parallel (i.e., to reach...[to] succeed); to be able to reach is replaced by the shorter to reach

e.the phrase to be able to reach is redundant and should be replaced by to reach

Q.2 With his sub-four minute mile Bannister broke a psychological barrier, inspiring thousands of others to attempt overcoming seemingly insurmountable hurdles.

A.inspiring thousands of others to attempt overcoming 

B.inspiring thousands of others to attempt to overcome

C.inspiring thousands of others to overcome 

D.and inspired thousands of others to attempt to overcome

E.and inspired thousands of others to attempt overcoming

Explanation: Option(D) is correct

In (A) the word ‘inspiring’ seems incorrectly to refer to the word ‘barrier’; also the expression ‘attempt overcoming’ is unidiomatic.

In D, the correct answer, ‘inspired’ is correctly parallel to ‘broke’, and ‘attempt to overcome’ is idiomatic.

Q.3  An analysis of sixteenth century probate inventories in the major English towns show that even some artisans and yeomen owned silver spoons, cups or salt cellars.

A.show that even some artisans and yeomen owned silver spoons, cups or 

B.show that some artisans and yeomen even owned silver spoons, cups or

C.show that even some artisans and yeomen owned silver spoons, cups and

D.shows that some artisans and yeomen owned even silver spoons, cups and 

E.shows that even some artisans and yeomen owned silver spoons, cups or

Explanation - Option(E) is correct

The subject of the sentence is ‘analysis’ and therefore the verb should be the singular ‘shows’. Hence either D or E must be correct.

The word ‘even’ should be in front of the word which it qualifies. The intention is to express surprise that some artisans owned silver, as indicated in E by putting ‘even’ in front of ‘artisans’, and not surprise at the spoons as implied in D.

In E, the correct answer, the word ‘or’ seems preferable because the artisan or yeoman might own any of the items and not necessarily all the items as would be implied by the use of ‘and’.

Q.4 In archaeological terms the university was a latecomer to the town, which was already centuries old by the time we first hear of the establishment of a community of scholars and teachers in the late 12th Century.

A.which was already centuries old by the time we first hear of the establishment of

B.already centuries old by the time we first hear of its establishment of 

C.which was centuries old already when we first hear of the establishment of 

D.that was already centuries old by the time we first are hearing of the establishing of 

E.that was already centuries old by the time we first hear that they had established

Explanation -Option(A) is correct

There is nothing wrong with the use of ‘which’ in choice A, since the description correctly refers to the work in front of the comma. It is better not t spend time worrying over the choice between ‘that’ and ‘which’ – look for other clear-cut problems.

We can eliminate E because the pronoun ‘they’ does not have an antecedent. We can eliminate D because it is too wordy and uses ‘establishing’ when ‘establishment’ would have been better.

We can eliminate C because ‘already’ is in the wrong place. And finally we can eliminate B because the use of ‘its’ makes the sentence less clear than what we have in A

Q5.The United Nations’ Human Development Index takes into account life expectancy, education, as well as income per person

A.into account life expectancy, education, as well as income per person 

B.life expectancy, education, as well as income per person into account 

C.into account life expectancy and education, as well as income per person

D.into account life expectancy, and education, and income per person

E.life expectancy, education, and income per person in its account

Explanation : Option(C) is correct

The problem with the original sentence is the list: we need to have an ‘and’ at the right point. We can have a list such as ‘a, b, and c’ when we intend the items to have equal weight.

Or we can have a list such as ‘a and b, as well as c’ if the first two items are to be taken together.

But we cannot have a list like this: a, b, as well as c. Nor can we have ‘a and b and c’. Using this information we can eliminate A, B and D.

Of the remaining choices, C is best as E is awkward and brings in an unnecessary ‘its’.

Q.6 Ricks has written extensively on not only major figures in English poetry like Milton and Housman, but also on the lyrics of Bob Dylan.

A.on not only major figures in English poetry like Milton, but also on

B.not only on the poetry of such major figures as Milton and Housman, but also on

C.not only on major figures in English poetry like Milton and Housman, but also on

D.on major figures in English poetry like Milton and Housman, as well as 

E.on major figures in English poetry such as Milton and Housman, but also on

Explanation: Option(B) is correct

In A the paired conjunctions ‘not only... but also’ are not used with correct parallel phrases: if ‘not only’ is followed by a prepositional phrase, ‘but also’ should also be followed by a preposition. The parallelism is not correct in D either.

The expression ‘such as’ is better than ‘like’ when we are giving examples, and so we can focus on B and E. B is better as the poetry of major figures (not the figures themselves) is contrasted to the lyrics of Dylan. In answer E the ‘but also’ is not correct without a ‘not’ earlier in the sentence.

Q.7 Because chickens lack teeth, they need another way to break apart the food they eat before reaching the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they swallow are used to grind their food.

A.before reaching the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they swallow are used to grind their food.

B.before it reaches the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they have swallowed is used to grind their food.

C.before it reaches the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they swallow are used to grind their food.

D.before reaching the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they have swallowed is used to grind their food.

E.before it reaches the stomach, and for this reason, chickens have a gizzard in which stones they have swallowed are used to grind their food.

Explanation : Option(E) is correct

This question focuses on verb tense and agreement, as well as general rhetorical construction. In this sentence all of the verbs agree with their subjects. However, the phrase before reaching the stomach does not have a clear subject. It appears to modify they, the chickens, instead of food. The present tense verb swallow should be replaced with the present perfect verb have swallowed in order to indicate that the swallowing occurred before the use of the stones.

Q.8 The publishers, unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, insisted that the author should pay half the cost of the initial print run of his controversial new book.

A.The publishers, unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, insisted that the author should pay half the cost of the initial print run of his controversial new book.

B.The publishers, unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, insisted that the author should be paying half the cost of the initial print run of the author’s controversial new book.

C.The publishers, unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, insisted that the author pay half the cost of the initial print run of his controversial new book.

D.Unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, the publishers insisted the author should pay half the cost of the initial print run of his controversial new book.

E.Unwilling to shoulder the entire risk, the author was required by the publisher to pay half the cost of the initial print run of his controversial new book.

Explanation : Option(C) is correct

The subjunctive expression ‘insisted that the author pay’ is correct in C. A, B and D are wrong because they incorrectly insert ‘should’.

E is incorrect because the ‘unwilling to shoulder the entire risk’ is incorrectly attributed to the author (dangling modifier problem).

Q.9 A course of cognitive behavior therapy can be as effective, if not more so, than drug therapy and without the side effects, in helping the elderly to overcome insomnia.

A.as effective, if not more so, than drug therapy and without the side effects, in helping the elderly to overcome insomnia

B.more effective than drug therapy and without the side effects, in helping the elderly to overcome insomnia

C.at least as effective in helping the elderly overcome insomnia as drug therapy, and is without the side effects of drug treatment 

D.at least as effective as drug therapy in helping the elderly to overcome insomnia without side effects 

E.equally effective as drug therapy in helping the elderly to overcome insomnia without side effects

Explanation : Option(C) is correct

The original version is incorrect because ‘as... as’, is correct, not ‘as... than’. Options B and E change the meaning – we need to convey that CBT is ‘at least as effective’, and so we should consider only C and D.

Although D is shorter, it is not correct because it seems to suggest that insomnia is without side effects. And so the answer is C.

Q.10 Studies show that teachers unconsciously assume that students who regularly perform poorly on assessments have below-average abilities, and in neglecting to provide the academic challenges that would catalyze their intellectual potential, the students often accept this damaging diagnosis and the life limits it implies.

(A) in neglecting to provide the academic challenges that would catalyze their intellectual potential

(B) when they neglect providing the academic challenges that would be catalyzing their intellectual potential

(C) when teachers neglect to provide the academic challenges that would catalyze their students’ intellectual potential

(D) in neglecting in providing the academic challenges that would catalyze their students’ intellectual potential

(E) in being neglectful with respect to providing the academic challenges that would be catalyzing their intellectual potential

Explanation: 3) Split #1: modifier problem.  The sentence begins with an independent clause, then a comma and the word “and”, introducing a second independent clause, the main clause of which follows the underlined part.  If the underlined part begins with participial phrase, this must modify “the students”, the subject of the second independent clause.  This is problematic, because the students don’t “neglect to provide the academic challenges” — that’s a teacher’s job, not a student’s job!  Choices (A) & (D) & (E) all have a participial phrase that illogically modifies “the students”, so these are incorrect.

Split #2: choice (B) makes the classic repeated pronouns mistake.  “… when they[the teachers] neglect providing the academic challenges that would be catalyzing their [the students’] intellectual potential …”  The pronoun “they”/”their” refers to two different antecedents in the same sentence!  That’s 100% illegal on the GMAT.  (B) is incorrect.

This leaves (C) as the only possible answer.

Q11. Simon Bolivar (1783 – 1830) is remembered in that he led the independence revolutions in several South American counties, like Venezuela and Bolivia, and for instilling the ideals of democracy across the continent.

(A) in that he led the independence revolutions in several South American counties, like Venezuela and Bolivia, and for instilling

(B) to have led the independence revolutions in several South American counties, such as Venezuela and Bolivia, and that he instilled

(C) to have led the independence revolutions in several South American counties, including Venezuela and Bolivia, and having instilled

(D) for leading the independence revolutions in several South American counties, like Venezuela and Bolivia, and to have instilled

(E) for leading the independence revolutions in several South American counties, such as Venezuela and Bolivia, and for instilling

Explanation :

#1: the idiom “P is remembered for doing X” is elegant way to refer to someone’s famous achievement.  The constructions “P is remembered in that he did X” and “P is remembered to have done X” are far more awkward and less smooth.  This is a problem with (A) & (B) & (C) & (D) all have problems with these.

Split #2: parallelism. The overall structure is “Bolivar is remembered ___ and ___” — those two blanks must have matching grammatical forms.  Let’s look at what’s in those slots:

(A) “in that he led … and for instilling” = NOT parallel

(B) “to have led … and that he instilled” = NOT parallel

(C) “to have led … and having instilled” = NOT parallel

(D) “for leading … and to have instilled” = NOT parallel

(E) “for leading … and for instilling” = CORRECT!

From either of these splits, we see that (E) is the only possible answer.

06 September, 2016

Important TRICKS: Jumbled Paragraph(Sentence Rearrangement)

By Bankersadda

Hello, Greeting!!

You all are preparing for govt. competitive exams (SSC, BANKING etc.) and We've realized that most of the students are not comfortable in English Section, especially when it comes to Jumbled Paragraph. All of you dread this section but worry No more.

Today, we present to you "One-stop Solution to all your confusions". Today in this post we'll introduce and demystify JUMBLED PARAGRAPHS. We suggest you to read and note down all the points.  Whenever You solve such Questions apply the following tricks. we've compiled all the tricks and rules in the best possible way so that you can master Sentence Arrangements (jumbled paragraph) with little effort.

Learn, Memorize and Practice.

What are Para jumbles?

Para jumbles are jumbled paragraphs. Basically, you are given a paragraph - but the sentences are not in the right order. It's up to you to untie this knot and rearrange the sentences so that they logically make sense.

The approaches for Jumbled Paragraph: -

(1). Establish Link Between Two Sentences and Then Examine the Options Suppose you establish the link 'BA'. The given options are:

(a) DABC

(b) ACDB

(c) CBAD

(d) DBAC.

Now you are left with option (c) and (d) to examine.

(2). Transition Words

Transition words make the shift from one idea to another very smooth. They organize and connect the sentences logically.

List of transition words-  again, as well as, besides,

furthermore, in addition, likewise, moreover, similarly, consequently, hence, otherwise, subsequently, therefore, thus, as a rule, generally, for instance, for example, for one thing, above all, aside from, barring, besides, in other words, in short, instead, likewise, on one hand, on the other hand, rather, similarly, yet, but, however, still, nevertheless, first of all, to begin with, at the same time, for now, for the time being, in time, later on, meanwhile, next, then, soon, the meantime, later, while, earlier, simultaneously, afterward, in conclusion, with this in mind, after all,

(3). Personal Pronouns

Personal pronouns are (he, she, it, him, her, they, you, your etc.)

Remember that personal pronouns always refer to a person, place or thing etc.

Therefore, if a sentence contains a personal pronoun without mentioning the person, place or object it is referring to, the person, place or object must have come in the previous sentence.

(4). Demonstrative Pronouns

The demonstrative pronouns are "this," "that," "these," and "those." "This" and "that" are used to refer to singular nouns or noun phrases and "these" and "those" are used to refer to plural nouns and noun phrases.

Whenever a sentence contains a demonstrative pronoun without mentioning the noun or the noun phrase, it means that the previous sentence must be mentioning that noun or noun phrase.

Finding that noun or noun phrase helps us connect two sentences.

(5). Acronym Approach

Full form vs. short form:

In PJ we encounter full and short names sometimes acronyms of some term or institution.

Example-World Trade Organization - WTO

Dr. Manmohan Singh - Dr. Singh

Karl Marx - Marx

President George W. Bush - President bush or the president

The rule is that if both full form, as well as short form, is present in different sentences, then the sentence containing full form will come before the sentence containing the short form.

(6). Articles Approach

Articles can be divided into two categories -

1. Definite (the) and

2. Indefinite (a and an).

When the author uses 'a / an' - he wants to make a general statement - wants to introduce the noun followed by a/an for the first time but when he uses 'the' he wants to refer back to some previously discussed noun. It means having 'the' is very unlikely in the opening sentence.

If 'a/an' and 'the' both are used for the same noun, then the sentence containing 'the' will come after the sentence containing a/an.

(7) Signal/Indicating Word List

Writers use transitions to link their ideas logically.

These transitions or signal words are clues that can help you figure out what the sentence actually means and its sequence.

(a) Cause and Effect Signals

Look for words or phrases explicitly indicating that one thing causes another or logically determines another.

Accordingly, in order to, because, so...that, consequently, therefore, given, thus

hence. when...then, if...then

(b) Support Signal Words

Look for the words or phrases supporting a given sentence.

These words containing sentences will not be the opening sentence. These sentences will follow immediately the sentence supported.

Furthermore, Additionally, Also, And, Too, as well, besides, indeed, likewise, moreover

(c) Contrast Signals

Look for function words or phrases (conjunctions, sentence adverbs, etc.) that explicitly indicate a contrast between one idea and another.

Albeit, Nevertheless, Although, Nonetheless, But, Notwithstanding, Despite, on the contrary

even though, on the other hand, however, rather than, In contrast, Still, In spite of, While, Instead of, yet

02 September, 2016

SSC CGL Exam: How to crack English Section

By BankersAdda

Today, this post is aimed at all the students/professionals, who are not comfortable using the English language. Whether it is Speaking/writing/reading or Listening. Today, the English language has become an indispensable part of all the competitive exams. If you want to have a successful career or profession, You’ve to master English language, otherwise, you’ll be left way behind in this competitive world.You’ll witness other aspirants getting succeeded in their respective exams/careers and you’ll end up Nowhere even after working so hard and investing so many important years of your life.
But Guys, everything is not lost, you still have the power to change the course of your destiny. At SSC ADDA, we’ll guide you and will work and stay with you in your quest of getting a reputed Govt. job.
The answer to all your problems/failures lies in a newspaper. For an SSC/Banking Aspirant, A newspaper is a complete package. If you read/follow any standard English newspaper, it will change your life for good dramatically. It’ll connect all the missing dots of your success.
If you read a newspaper daily for at least 2 hours, it will help you in cultivating Reading habit, which is the most sought after skill in a student or professional, who want to excel in their respective career/lives.

11 April, 2016

Some important English Words

1. Call in : किसी को बुलवाना
2. Call off : समाप्त करना, वापस लेना
3. Call up : याद करना, टेलीफोन करना
4. Call for : माँग करना, आवशयकता होना
5. Call on : थोड़ी देर के लिए जाना या रुकना
6. Call out : बुलाना
7. Call at : किसी के घर या स्थान आदि पर थोड़ी देर के लिए जाना
8. Call back : वापस बुलाना